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  • Own It - A place to help you boss your life online What is Own It?They are there to help you be the boss of your online life. Whatever you need – help and advice, skills, inspiration - they've got it covered ...
    Posted 27 Feb 2019, 23:25 by N Nelson
  • What is the MOMO Challenge? Hampshire Police have sent us this information which parents might find useful.Mirroring the ‘Blue Whale’ suicide-game of 2017, The MOMO Challenge is targeted at children and young people ...
    Posted 4 Mar 2019, 23:26 by N Nelson
  • Common Sense Media Following on from the esafe meeting session at the Year 7 Parents' Evening, we thought it would be useful to share this link. Common Sense Media rates and reviews apps ...
    Posted 7 Feb 2019, 23:53 by N Nelson
  • Staying Safe Online - Latest News Tik Tok Currently the most popular free app on the App Store in the US, having been downloaded almost 80 million times, this Chinese video app, TikTok, has also recently ...
    Posted 18 Dec 2018, 02:47 by N Nelson
  • Childnet Online Resources Childnet produce a range of resources for parents, students and teachers. Their mission is to work with others to help make the internet a great and a safe place for ...
    Posted 5 Nov 2018, 03:35 by N Nelson
Showing posts 1 - 5 of 24. View more »

We have highlighted a number of websites you might find useful.

An excellent site providing information on child abuse and other related issues. Parents and children are able to report attempts at grooming to the global taskforce.

Sexting - What parents need to know. A new campaign about Sexting has been launched.

Part of the CEOP Centre's work to promote safe internet use. Register on their site and receive a range of resources to use with children and young people in schools and other organisations. These include webcam safety videos and factsheets to hand to parents.

A non profit organisation working with others to “help make the Internet a great and safe place for children”. The site contains excellent Internet safety information for parents and children.
More good ideas and a 10 minute online presentation.
 
Advice on what to do if you think your child is being bullied.
 
Interactive resource dealing with the main causes for concern.
 
An excellent site with lots of good information to help them understand the importance of safe surfing.
 
A useful jargon buster of terms.
 
Please don't forget that the internet and social media is an excellent tool when used responsibly and you are aware of the issues. If you are concerned about anything you should report it. 

Own It - A place to help you boss your life online

posted 27 Feb 2019, 23:25 by N Nelson

What is Own It?

They are there to help you be the boss of your online life. Whatever you need – help and advice, skills, inspiration - they've got it covered.

Get advice

Find straight answers and get support, and know what to do if you have a problem online.

From friendship and bullying to safety and self-esteem.

Get skills

Vlogging, gaming, creating – all the things you’re passionate about.

Get tips, knowledge and insider info on all the internet’s secrets.

Get inspiration

Check out what’s new and amazing in the online world, and get ideas for your digital future.

Need help?

If you need urgent help right now, we can get you the right support, right away.

You can find them here.

What is the MOMO Challenge?

posted 27 Feb 2019, 04:05 by N Nelson   [ updated 4 Mar 2019, 23:26 ]


Hampshire Police have sent us this information which parents might find useful.


Mirroring the ‘Blue Whale’ suicide-game of 2017, The MOMO Challenge is targeted at children and young people through social media by people presenting as MOMO, a terrifying looking doll.

The doll encourages them to add a contact on messaging service WhatsApp from an unknown number, once contact is made, children are subsequently bombarded with terrifying images and messages reportedly ranging from threats and dares which encourage them to self-harm and even commit suicide.

Although known of in other parts of the world since last year, it appears to be making its way across the UK.

MOMO has been associated to multiple platforms used by children including Youtube, Kidstube, Instagram, Facebook and WhatsApp.

Police in Northern Ireland have warned parents after a mother reported finding the ‘creepy game’ on her 7 year old daughter’s iPad; they have since posted a message about the challenge on Facebook, referring to a video of a MOMO interaction in America showing an ‘ominous sounding voice recording’ sent to a child, telling them to use a knife on their own throat – with another making threats against a child’s family if a 'challenge' is not completed, describing it as ‘chilling viewing’.

So far, a 12-year-old girl and a 16-year-old boy, both from Colombia, are thought to have killed themselves after taking part in the MOMO challenge. The deaths occurred in September, just 48 hours apart, it was thought that the two knew each other. After the police seized their phones, they said they found messages that were linked to the game.

A concerned British mother spoke to the media last week to highlight that the ‘sick game’ had already spread to Manchester, after her 7yr old son told her that some of his schoolmates told him to look up the MOMO challenge; she went on to say that when they watched the video, the MOMO character told him to tell everyone to be in fear of MOMO or it will kill him in his sleep, causing distress to the boy and his friends.  

The Real Motive? Police in Northern Ireland outlined in their statement that they believe the game is being used by hackers seeking and harvesting information, warning that while it is perceived as an horrendous ‘suicide game’ targeting children, likely to get thousands of hits, it ‘misses the bigger picture’. There are now numerous variations and imitators.

NSPCC Response & Advice for Parents: A spokesperson for the NSPCC in Northern Ireland said: "The constantly evolving digital world means a steady influx of new apps and games and can be hard for parents to keep track of. "That's why it's important for parents to talk regularly with children about these apps and games and the potential risks they can be exposed to.  "The NSPCC publishes advice and guidance for parents on discussing overall online safety with their children, as well as promoting Net Aware - the UK's only parental guide to social media and gaming apps."

  • Among the most common signs to watch out for include children who:
  • Become very secretive, especially about what they are doing online
  • Are spending a lot of time on the internet and social media
  • Are switching screens on their device when approached
  • Are withdrawn or angry after using the internet or sending text messages
  • Have lots of new phone numbers or email addresses on their devices

If adults are concerned or have any questions on how to approach the subject with their children, they can contact the NSPCC Helpline on 0808 800 5000 or visit the NSPCC website. Children who are worried about their activity on apps or online games can contact Childline 24 hours a day, online and over the phone on 0800 1111.

Common Sense Media

posted 7 Feb 2019, 23:53 by N Nelson   [ updated 7 Feb 2019, 23:53 ]

Following on from the esafe meeting session at the Year 7 Parents' Evening, we thought it would be useful to share this link. Common Sense Media rates and reviews apps, games, etc www.commonsensemedia.org

Staying Safe Online - Latest News

posted 18 Dec 2018, 02:47 by N Nelson

Tik Tok

Currently the most popular free app on the App Store in the US, having been downloaded almost 80 million times, this Chinese video app, TikTok, has also recently taken over Music.aly and is growing in popularity here in the UK. 

A platform for creating and sharing entertaining short-form video content (15 seconds), as well as live broadcasting, users typically post short, comical videos of themselves lip-syncing to a song or film-clip. 

BE AWARE: as with Houseparty, with no system in place to verify a user’s age, inappropriate content (often popular music that does contain explicit language) can and does appear in the stream. 

While privacy settings allow users to decide whether other users can upload and comment on content, when these aren’t selected videos can end up in open forums (e.g. Instagram) and attract negative comments which can ultimately impact mental wellbeing.

Instagram TV (IGTV)

This long form video sharing service was launched in June 2018 and allows users to upload videos up to one hour in length (video capabilities had previously been limited to a maximum of 30 seconds on Instagram). It is essentially a video free-for-all: subscribers can view videos from the people they follow and popular “creators”.  In the long term Instagram wants to host “shows” that will challenge traditional TV.   

BE AWARE: no content restrictions and unmanaged hashtags make it very easy for children and young people to view inappropriate material.

Houseparty

Houseparty allows up to 8 separate people to chat simultaneously using a split screen feature – with separate chat boxes for each member of the ‘party’, meaning participants can see the whole party in real time. Outside of pure recreation, older children and teens enjoy using this app for group school projects. 

BE AWARE: with no minimum age setting, mature content, explicit material and sexting are a risk.  If privacy filters aren’t used, while specific friends may have been selected for the chat, any connections of any of the invited participants can also pop into the chat group.

 

 

Childnet Online Resources

posted 5 Nov 2018, 03:35 by N Nelson

Childnet produce a range of resources for parents, students and teachers. Their mission is to work with others to help make the internet a great and a safe place for children and young people. You can find out more on their website.


Get Safe Online

posted 16 Jul 2018, 23:40 by N Nelson

Get Safe Online is a website that provides lots of information about staying safe online. They have produced this guide to keeping children safe over the holidays.

 https://www.getsafeonline.org/safekids/

 

Twitter - A Guide for Parents and Students

posted 27 Jun 2018, 07:14 by N Nelson

Age…
  13 +

Consists of… 

Photo/Video Sharing

Messaging

Location Sharing

Content Sharing

About the app:

Twitter is a social media site and app that lets you post public messages called tweets. These can be up to 280 characters long. As well as tweets, you can send private messages and post pictures/videos. Brands, companies and celebrities can also have Twitter accounts.

https://www.net-aware.org.uk/networks/twitter/

For more detailed information on Twitter and its safety, rules and regulations. Press Ctrl + Click the link above!

Children’s Views:

What do children and young people say to look out for:

15% of the children and young people who reviewed Twitter thought it was unsafe. The main things they told us they don’t like about Twitter were:

·        Seeing inappropriate content

·        It can be used for bullying people

·        It’s hard to know what’s true

Why young people like it:

·        People write funny tweets

·        Being able to express yourself

·        Following celebrities and finding out what’s going on in the world

Parents say:

“Apart from choosing a user name, it was very easy to sign up. With a valid email address, you can sign up as anybody. Absolutely no measures in place to verify ID or age.” – Father of a 13-year-old girl

“There’s plenty of sexist, racist and fascist content on Twitter. Intolerance towards ethnic minorities, women being bullied, dismissed or sexualised. There are hard-core pornographic accounts on Twitter.” – Father of 11 and 13 year olds

Young people say:

“I like that I can see what’s happening at certain places and what people think about certain things. Without the right settings you can be contacted by anyone but it is simple to set privacy settings.” Boy – 13                     

“It is very difficult to control the information that circulates throughout Twitter, as anyone can share tweets, images and videos of another person, whose content could be deemed offensive.” 18-Year-Old

“I like healthy discussion with people you wouldn't be able to normally talk to. But such a high usage means different people with different opinions can cause people to be offended and argue just to offend.” Girl - 17

What Twitter say: "Twitter is the place to find out about what's happening in the world right now. Whether you're interested in music, sports, politics, news, celebrities, or everyday moments—come to Twitter to see and join in on what's happening now."

Safe Watching and Sharing of Videos

posted 15 Jun 2018, 00:51 by N Nelson

Please click on this link to read more about promoting safe watching and sharing of online videos

Keeping Children Safe Online

posted 11 May 2018, 01:37 by N Nelson

The course is Free but we do ask individuals to book a ticket so that we can manage numbers. To book a ticket click HERE or visit the LSCB website www.iowscb.org.uk

Instagram: A Guide for Students and Parents/Carers

posted 24 Apr 2018, 05:16 by Nat Admin

Age…  13 +


Consists of…  

Photo/Image Sharing

Messaging

Location Sharing

Content Sharing


About the app:

Instagram is a picture and video sharing app. Users can post content and use hashtags to share experiences, thoughts or memories with an online community. You can follow your friends, family, celebrities and even companies on Instagram. Instagram allows live streaming.


https://www.net-aware.org.uk/networks/snapchat/

For more detailed information on the Snapchat App and its safety, rules and regulations. Press Ctrl + Click the link above!


Children’s Views:

What do children and young people say to look out for:


34% of the children and young people who reviewed Instagram thought that it can be risky. The top risks were:

  • Strangers following or talking to them, particularly adults

  • Bullying, especially people posting mean posts or pictures

  • Hacking and fake accounts

  • People screenshotting and sharing their pictures and videos without permission



Why young people like it:

  • The main things that young people told us they liked about this site were:

  • Seeing what your friends are doing and commenting on their pictures

  • Following your favourite celebrities

  • Seeing and sharing funny pictures and videos


Parents say:

“Parents should be aware of the option to have your profile private. It may not stop children from seeing what's on other people's profiles and feeds but as long as they are careful who they accept as a follower they can keep their own information private.” - Father of girls aged 10 and 11

“It's easy to set the account to private. It's also easy to look at the followers list to check images aren't shared inappropriately.” - Father of girls aged 7, 11 and 13


Young people say:

“It can be risky if you’re not private as strangers can follow you and message you and you can see photos you shouldn’t be seeing.” - Girl, 13

“Anyone can see your pictures if you don't have a private account.” - Boy, 15

“If you put the location on your photo people can see it.” - Girl, 13

82% of young people who reviewed Instagram said they know how to change their privacy settings on this site.

64% said they know how to turn off their location settings.


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